Othello act 4 scene 2 summary. Othello Act 4, Scene 2 Summary 2019-02-21

Othello act 4 scene 2 summary Rating: 4,7/10 671 reviews

Othello

othello act 4 scene 2 summary

Othello continues to condemn Desdemona despite assurances from both Emilila and Desdemona herself that she is faithful and honest. He leaves, ordering Emilia to stay with Desdemona. He implies Othello is devil-like, with his lust, indiscretion, and strangeness to Venice; the irony is that Iago is so quick to make others out to be evil, when it is he who is the center of blackness and foul deeds in the play. If haply you my father do suspect An instrument of this your calling back, Lay not your blame on me: If you have lost him, Why, I have lost him too. Because Iago is a very good judge of human nature, he is able to manipulate others with ease - and, this cleverness also means that he is a source of wisdom in the play, no matter how wickedly he chooses to use this knowledge.

Next

No Fear Shakespeare: Othello: Act 4 Scene 2

othello act 4 scene 2 summary

And ever will—though he do shake me off To beggarly divorcement—love him dearly, 165. He would rather have Roderigo stay so that he can continue to slowly steal all of his money. Cassio confirms that he simply found the handkerchief and that he and Desdemona were never lovers. But seeing Desdemona's handkerchief in Cassio's hand is the proof that Othello goes on, and thus kills her. If any wretch have put this in your head, 16. Othello Pines and Plots The scene opens as Othello finds Desdemona sleeping.

Next

Othello by William Shakespeare: Summary Act 4

othello act 4 scene 2 summary

Cassio gratefully assents to the plan. He knows that she will soon be murdered by her husband, and this grief, which she suffers and weeps over now, is small trouble in comparison. Although one of his greatest fears regarding Desdemona's alleged infidelity was that it would blacken his name and reputation, the irony is that Othello is doing that himself; in striking Desdemona out of unreasonable cruelty, he besmirches his own good name. Just her mention of Cassio sends him into an unreasonable rage; every little thing he regards with suspicion, even if he has no cause. Cassio is deeply ashamed and concerned about his reputation. Enter Roderigo: After pretending to sympathize with what Desdemona has suffered from the jealous Othello, Iago has to deal with another small problem. Othello offers it once more, in vain, before leaving in a state of despairing rage.

Next

Othello

othello act 4 scene 2 summary

She wants her wedding sheets on her bed in hopes that the Othello she loves will return to her. Come, stand not amazed at it, but go along with me; I will show you such a necessity in his death that you shall think yourself bound to put it on. In the final scene, Othello does abruptly decide that he has been deceived all along by Iago, but not because he is confronted by compelling proof. Iago often talks of webs and ensnaring Cassio and Othello. O, ay; as summer flies are in the shambles, That quicken even with blowing. He had seen her do it.

Next

Othello Act 4, Scene 2 Summary

othello act 4 scene 2 summary

Of one whose hand, like the base Indian, threw a pearl away richer than all his tribe. Emilia assures Othello that Desdemona is faithful and adds her own opinion: She speaks for the first time her theory that some villain is telling Othello lies to turn him against Desdemona. Here I kneel: If e'er my will did trespass 'gainst his love, 153. Othello's pride first becomes visible here; he is exceptionally proud of his achievements and his public stature, and pride is an overarching theme of Othello's story. She prattles on about this for a while, and Iago tells her to speak quietly, but Emilia notes that it was a very similar scheme, lies from a lying liar, that made Iago believe Othello had been with her too. However, Iago joins his two plots, enrolling Roderigo in the plan to kill Cassio, and Roderigo's rebellion fades away. Desdemona knows that she will die soon; she sings a song of sadness and resignation, and decides to give herself to her fate.

Next

Othello Act 4, scene 2 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

othello act 4 scene 2 summary

Iago's poison has done its work, though, and the handkerchief he stole from Desdemona and planted in Cassio's room is a 'proof' Othello clings to: 'By heaven, I saw my handkerchief in 's hand,' he insists. He holds tightly to the idea that she has betrayed him, because by now he has built this idea into his view of himself. And the fool, Roderigo, again falls for Iago. Indeed, his powers of language successfully win the Duke over, and soften Brabantio's disapproval. Thrown such despite and heavy terms upon her, As true hearts cannot bear. Brabantio knows nothing of this coupling; Iago decides to enlist Roderigo, who lusts after Desdemona, to awaken Brabantio with screams that his daughter is gone.

Next

Othello Act II Summary

othello act 4 scene 2 summary

To a certain extent, Othello is indeed mad, so wrapped up in his obsession that he can hardly consider other things. Iago has not given him a chance to spend any time with Desdemona, has not even given him any realistic hope that he'll ever see her, and Roderigo declares that he won't put up with it anymore. As she prepares for bed, she has a strange foreboding of her imminent death. His strong objection foreshadows a confrontation between him and his daughter, and if Desdemona does choose to stay with Othello, it seems likely she will risk her father's love. At this point, Cassio joins Iago and offers to lend assistance in reviving the General only to be dissuaded by Iago who argues that a coma is better left to run its course, and, seeing the General coming to, he persuades Cassio to absent himself from the General for now, but to stay nearby as Iago would like a word with him. Indeed, this is one of the reasons why Othello is so angry with Desdemona; the thought that she could have desire in her, just as he does, bewilders and angers him. Some cogging, cozening slave, to get some office, Have not devised this slander; I will be hang'd else.

Next

OTHELLO, Act 4, Scene 2

othello act 4 scene 2 summary

Meanwhile, Desdemona isn't concerned about who the villain might be. We also learn that Roderigo had given these jewels to Iago to deliver to Desdemona, and Iago has assured Roderigo he has done so. This describes Iago exactly, and it makes him uncomfortable. O thou weed, Who art so lovely fair and smell'st so sweet That the sense aches at thee, would thou hadst ne'er been born! This is not a satisfactory frame of mind for an investigator, and it is certainly not an acceptable frame of mind for a military commander responsible for law and order in a colony. Iago's knowledge of this allows him to do away with this balance and set chaos into motion, which leads to tragedy. Since Iago himself is two-faced, Janus seems to be a fitting figure for Iago to invoke.

Next